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Roundup

This page features brief excerpts of stories published by the mainstream media and, less frequently, blogs, alternative media, and even obviously biased sources. The excerpts are taken directly from the websites cited in each source note. Quotation marks are not used.




  • The Measures of a Successful Vice-Presidential Pick

    by Michael Beschloss

    Now that Joe Biden has announced Senator Kamala Harris will be his running mate, readers can decide how well the pick meets Michael Beschloss's criteria for a beneficial choice. 



  • The Problem with Asking Police to Enforce Public Health Measures

    by Emily Brooks

    World War II-era campaigns against prostitution in New York City show that enacting public health controls through the police department results in racially unequal enforcement and increased policing of communities of color. 



  • What Should We Do With Plantations?

    by Tiya Miles

    The lavish estates where Black people were enslaved usually whitewash their history. Here's how these places might begin to redeem themselves.



  • A Song That Changed Music Forever

    by David Hajdu

    With “Crazy Blues,” Mamie Smith opened the door to a surge of powerfully voiced female singers who defied the conventions of singerly gentility to make the blues a popular phenomenon in the 1920s.



  • The Last Pandemic

    by E. Thomas Ewing

    As we look to history for lessons in early 2020, we need to think broadly about how understanding the complexity of the past can inform decisions in the present and the future.



  • You've Got No Mail

    by Philip Rubio

    Americans should not have to keep worrying about the attempted theft of our nation’s postal service.



  • Just for Fun, Games Historians Play

    by Randall Ballmer

    Counterfactual scenarios have a tremendous allure for historians at idle times, as does speculating about what historians will remember about the present. A noted historian of American religion has some thoughts on both topics. 



  • Opinion: 75 Years On, Remember Hiroshima And Nagasaki. But Remember Toyama Too

    by Cary Karacas and David Fedman

    AAF officials commonly used sanitizing language to mask the fact that they were targeting entire cities for destruction. Press releases described attacks not on cities, but on "industrial urban areas." Tactical reports set their sights not on densely populated neighborhoods, but on "worker housing."



  • Richard Nixon Bears Responsibility for the Pandemic’s Child-Care Crisis

    by Anna K. Danziger Halperin

    Today’s child-care crisis may have been fueled by the outbreak, but it is not new. It has been simmering below the surface for decades and can be traced back to President Richard M. Nixon’s 1971 veto of federally funded universal child care.



  • News From the Dead

    by Eileen Sperry

    The experiences of convicted women who were "resurrected" after being unsuccessfully hanged illuminate the precarious legal and social standing of women in early modern England. 



  • Is This the Beginning of the End of American Racism?

    by Ibram X. Kendi

    The slaveholders’ attempts to perpetuate their system backfired; in the years before the Civil War, the inhumanity and cruelty of enslavement became too blatant for northerners to ignore or deny.



  • Faneuil Hall Name Change Needed

    by Marty Blatt and David J. Harris

    We might well ask whether Peter Faneuil actually paid for the building or whether it was purchased by the lives and freedom of those he transported and sold.