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urban history



  • How Suburbs Swung the 2020 Election

    by Richard Florida, Marie Patino and Rachel Dottle

    The noted urban theorist points out that assumptions about suburban voters haven't kept up with the changing demographic realities of America's suburbs, which house a majority of the population and differ from each other as much as they do from central cities. 



  • Reservoir: Nature, Culture, Infrastructure

    by Luc Sante

    A four-part series of essays and photography examines the creation, maintenance and consequences of the reservoirs constructed to supply water to New York City, including the complex divisions and connections among urban and rural communities. 



  • Georgia’s Political Shift – a Tale of Urban and Suburban Change

    by Jan Nijman

    If Georgia is demographically and politically becoming unlike neighboring Republican strongholds like Alabama and Tennessee, it has, in some respects, moved in a similar direction as Arizona, where the two major metropolitan regions of Phoenix and Tucson make up over 80% of the state’s population, and where Democrats have improved their standing in recent years.



  • Trumpania, U.S.A.: Making Federal Buildings Fascist Again

    by Ed Simon

    Trump's obsession with establishing neoclassical architecture as the default style for federal buildings echoes the delusional plan of Adolf Hitler to rebuild bombed Berlin in a monumental style purged of "decadent" modernism. 



  • Inside Decades of Nepotism and Bungling at the N.Y.C. Elections Board

    “I expect the B.O.E. to pull this off — there’s no other option. It’s the most important election of our lifetime,” said Scott Stringer, the city comptroller. “But we shouldn’t have to hold our breath because of their gross incompetence.”



  • UHA Announces Award Winners

    The Urban History Association announces its annual awards for best book, best journal article, and best dissertation.



  • Accuracy and Authenticity in a Digital City

    by Anne Sarah Rubin

    The technological capacity to render the city of the past in minute detail doesn't replace the work of interpreting and understanding how people lived in its spaces.